Wednesday, 30 May 2012

Cambodia 14 Jakarta 15 Malaysia 16 Bangkok 17

Today's post might be a bit confusing as we skip between cities, provinces and countries. First up we have the Kingdom of Cambodia (14 on the map). Next up we have the City of Jakarta (15 on the map) in the Republic of  Indonesia. Then Malaysia (16 on the map) has separate Crowns for 9 of its 13 provinces and the City of Bangkok  (17 on the map) houses the Palace and Crown of Thailand's King.



Cambodia/Phnom Phen/Royal Palace (Not Displayed 1 crown)

The Crown of Cambodia

The cone shaped crown is of a typical style for a Buddhist monarchy. This is a modern copy of the original gold and gem encrusted crown that was lost during the Lon Nol Coup of 1970.

Indonesia/Jakarta/National Museum (Permanent Display 1 crown)

Crown of Sultan Syarif Kasim II

This Muslim crown called a Mahkota was used by the last Sultan of  Siak who joined his region to greater Indonesia in 1945.  

Malaysia has 9 provinces who have traditional Royal Families and displays of Crown Jewels. Every 2 years one of the provincial monarchs takes office as King of all Malaysia on a rotation basis. The Kingdom of Malaysia has a ceremonial headdress for its King as well. 

Malaysia/Kuala Lampur/Istana Negara Palace (1headdress)

The Tengkolok Dijara or King's Headdress. 

Each of the 9 sultanates has its own crown/headdress kept in the royal palace of the respective state (Photo List incomplete).

The Crown of the Sultan of Selangor

The Headdress of the Sultan of Perak

Crown of the Sultan of Johor

The Crown of the Sultan of Kelantan

Crown of the Sultan of Terengganu

(No Photo)
Sultan of Pehang

(No Photo)
Sultan of Perlis

(No Photo)
Sultan of Kedah

(No Photo)
Sultan of Negeri Sembilan

Thailand/Bankok/Grand Palace (Permanent Display 2crowns)

The Crown of Victory

Buddhist regalia is blessed by the priesthood and thus considered as holy objects, to be worn by the semi divine Kings. This crown, made of gold and set with precious stones was worn by King Bumihbol of Thailand, for his coronation in the early 1950’s. Thailand also boasts a Prince's Crown. 

Crown Prince's Crown

(All images on this blog are considered defaulted to the public domain due to age and ready sourcing from the internet. If an image on this blog is disputed it will be altered or removed following written protest from an authentic source. please contact me at danielgswan@hotmail.com)

Sunday, 27 May 2012

Beijing 12 and Brunei 13

We have reached China and its greatest city, Beijing (12 on the map). The Chinese Empresses had some elaborate headpieces which could be seen as "crowns" from a western mindset and there are at least two separate exhibits containing these. Next we move to the tiny Sultanate of Brunei (13 on the map). An oil rich independent state neighbouring Malaysia, its ruling sultan also displays his crown. 



China/Beijing/Forbidden City Palace Museum (Permanent Display 1crown)

Ming Dynasty Crown for an Empress

China/Beijing/Dingling Museum (Permanent Display 4crowns)

Ming Dynasty Crown for an Emperor

Ming Dynasty Crown for an Empress

Ming Dynasty Crown of an Empress

Ming Dynasty Crown of an Empress

All the crowns displayed at the Dingling Museum came from excavated tombs. It was the tradition of the Ming Royals to be buried with large quantities of their valuables. 

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/life/2011-08/16/content_13126252.htm

Brunei/Bandar Seri Begawan/Royal Regalia Building (Permanent Display 2crowns, other diadems)

 The Crown of the Sultan of Brunei. 

This crown called a Mahkota  is used to actually crown the Sultan. It is made of solid gold in the traditional style of the region. 

The Crown of the Crown Prince of Brunei.

The Nuptial Headdress of the Crown Princess of Brunei. 

(All images on this blog are considered defaulted to the public domain due to age and ready sourcing from the internet. If an image on this blog is disputed it will be altered or removed following written protest from an authentic source. please contact me at danielgswan@hotmail.com)

Friday, 25 May 2012

Tonga 10 Okinawa 11

Moving on from Hawaii westward our meridian drops below the Equator to the Island Kingdom of Tonga (10 on the map). Here a small Island Kingdom still has a European style local government with a king that is still crowned with a solid gold crown. Above the Equator in Okinawa, Japan (11 on the map) a historic exhibition includes a replica of the crown worn by Okinawa's former independent rulers.



Tonga/Nuku'alofa/Royal Palace of Tonga (Not Displayed 1crown)

The Crown of Tonga 1873

This Crown is made of solid gold and employs European heraldic symbols of Royalty like the cross and the fleur d' lys. It was made in 1873 and although used by the Tongalese kings in their coronation ceremonies, is kept in the Palace which is not open to the public. 

Japan/Okinawa/Shuri Castle (Permanent Display 1crown)

Crown of Okinawa (replica)

This modern replica is made of leather, brass and semi-precious beads. It is made to copy existing records of the original crown and forms part of the historic display at the Shuri Castle in Okinawa. 

(All images on this blog are considered defaulted to the public domain due to age and ready sourcing from the internet. If an image on this blog is disputed it will be altered or removed following written protest from an authentic source. please contact me at danielgswan@hotmail.com)

Wednesday, 23 May 2012

Mexico City 8 and Honolulu 9

As we crossed the Americas I realized something concerning my blog. In Washington DC there are separate displays containing Royal Tiaras and another display of a Papal Tiara. Elsewhere in America we find displays of Episcopal Crowns and in South America there is a Crown of the Andes made from gold and emeralds for a statue of Mary. This means we will have to take a second trip around the world focusing on, Papal Tiaras, episcopal Crowns and Royal Tiaras. I thing the crowns made especially for the Virgin Mary would have to fall in another category. There is obviously also a need to touch on ancient crowns like those in Egypt. For this we would also have to make a round trip. 

In this post we move further west and reach Mexico City (8 on the map). In a similar story to Brazil, Mexico was once ruled by a Royal hailing from a European Royal Family. The Mexican monarchy ended in a bloody revolution but its history and a replica of the Imperial crown can still be seen today. Across the Pacific, in Hawaii (9 on the map), we find the most unlikely exhibit of the Kings of Hawaii.


Mexico/Mexico City/Casa Imperiale Chapultepec (Permanent Display 1crown)


The Crown of Mexico (replica)

 This carved copy is merely painted gold but is a relatively good representation of what the Crown of Mexico looked like. The style of the crown includes aspects reflecting the Imperial Crown of  Austria and that of Napoleon. 


Hawaii/Honolulu/Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum (Permanent Display 2crowns)

The King and Queen's Crowns of Hawaii. 

Hawaii also sported a semi autonomous monarchy, with Palace and Crowns, in the 1800's. The "Kingdom" of Hawaii was the Europeanized version of the historic Chiefs of Hawaii. This form of government is now fully abolished but the descendants of the ancient chiefs still live on the island chain.

(All images on this blog are considered defaulted to the public domain due to age and ready sourcing from the internet. If an image on this blog is disputed it will be altered or removed following written protest from an authentic source. please contact me at danielgswan@hotmail.com)

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

Rio De Janeiro 6 and Washington DC 7

We cross the Atlantic and the Equator as our imaginary meridian reaches west to Rio De Janeiro (6 on the map). Very few people would expect a Crown Jewel display in South America but Brazil was once an Empire with a European style Emperor descended from the Portuguese Royal House of Braganza. On the outskirts of Rio lies Petropolis and the Imperial Palace. Then we keep on towards Washington DC in the U.S.A. (7 on the map). Here we also unexpectedly find a European Crown from the Russian Imperial Collection.



Brazil/Petropolis/Imperial Museum (Permanent Display 2crowns)

The Imperial Crown of Don Pedro II of Brazil

The Imperial Crown of Don Pedro I of Brazil, later used as The Empress Crown

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_Crown_of_Brazil

Moving on to the United States. From there many wealthy American magnates bought up large quantities of European jewellery collection after the First and Second World Wars toppled monarchies and left the continent ravaged financially.

USA/Washington DC/Hillwood Museum (Permanent Display 1crown)


The Nuptial Crown/Coronet of the Romanov Brides

This crown, made from sections of a diamond belt was used by members of the Romanov Imperial Family to adorn the head of their brides. It was worn at the back of the head in conjunction with the Pink diamond Tiara which was worn above the brow. It came to America after it was purchased by a collector at the famous sale of the Imperial Jewels by the Communist Government after the Russian Revolution.

http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org/collection/item/17.63?r=/collection/search?filter=Category:Jewelry&p=7

(All images on this blog are considered defaulted to the public domain due to age and ready sourcing from the internet. If an image on this blog is disputed it will be altered or removed following written protest from an authentic source. please contact me at danielgswan@hotmail.com)

Monday, 21 May 2012

Cardiff and leaving the British Isles 4 and Lisbon and Machado de Castro 5

We move slightly more westward and reach Cardiff in Wales (4 on the map). As we leave Great Britain we have to mention that there are other very small exhibits just worth the mention dotted through the Isles. Just below Wales on the meridian we find Portugal and its capital city Lisbon. We place it with Machado de Castro (5 on the map) due to Portugal being a small country. 


Britain/Cardiff/National Museum and Gallery (Permanent Display 1crown)

Crown of the Prince of Wales 1969

In an attempt to showcase contemporary British design and technology, this new coronet was made for the investiture of Prince Charles in 1969. Many consider this crown to be ugly but it does however, remain as a historical reflection of the typical jewellery style of the late 60s and as such, should be appreciated and preserved. Employing the cutting edge technology from the 60’s called lectroforming, this coronet is made from Welsh gold and set with diamonds and Welsh emeralds. It retains the prescribed symbology of a true Prince of Wales’ coronet, including the single arch. 

Several titled families in Britain have opened their ancestral homes to the public. These "working museums" display various historical artifacts which often include the heraldic coronets related to the various peerage titles. please take note that the male and feamale coronets for each rank are exactly the same except a lady's coronet is smaller. The Jeweller Garrard's also keeps in its vaults many of the official coronets as a repository, until these will be required for the next coronation which is the only time they are required to be worn. 

Britain/Various Locations/Private (Displays various peerage coronets)

A coronet for a Princess of the First Blood

A coronet for a Prince of the Second Blood

A coronet for a Prince of the Second Blood in the Direct Line

A Duke's coronet

The coronet worn by a Marquess

A coronet for an Earl (the British version of a Count)

A Viscount's coronet

The coronet for a Baroness

Portugal/Lisbon/Ajuda Palace (Permanent Display 1crown)

Essentially a heraldic ornament made from gold, this crown is never worn but like its Spanish counterpart was just displayed at official functions as a symbol. it isn't set with any stones. 

Portugal/Machado de Castro/National Museum (Permanent Display 2crowns)

Renaissance Crown 1550

Silver Crown

(The images on this blog are considered defaulted to the public domain due to age and ready sourcing from the internet. If an image on this blog is disputed it will be altered or removed following written protest from an authentic source. Please contact me at danielgswan@hotmail.com)authentic source.



Saturday, 19 May 2012

Edinburgh 2 and Madrid, Toledo and Granada 3

Our next move westward has our meridian cutting closest through Edinburgh in Scotland (2 on the map) and Madrid, Toledo and Granada in Spain (3 on the map). Barcelona will be dealt with once we have circumnavigated the planet and return to Europe to deal with France and Paris. 


Britain/Edinburgh/Edinburgh Castle (Permanent Display 1crown)

Crown of Scotland

The Crown of Scotland is part of the collection known as the Honours of Scotland. A beautiful specimen of early renaissance craftsmanship, it is the oldest crown in Britain. The sovereign is never crowned with it, nor is it ever worn, but it is officially handed over to the sovereign in a ceremony held in Edinburgh shortly after the coronation in London.

Britain/Edinburgh/St. Andrew’s University (Permanent Display 1 coronet)


Crown of the Lord Lyon of Scotland
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crown_of_Lord_Lyon_King_of_Arms.JPG

Spain/Madrid/Patrimonio Nacional (Periodic Display 2crowns)

Crown of Spain

This crown of Spain is merely a golden symbolic trinket, meant to replace the actual crown. The Crown Jewels were “lost” in an affair akin to the fairytales of Europe. During Napoleon’s invasion, the, then King ordered the crown jewels walled up in one of the rooms of the vast Escorial Palace, to keep them safe. He then kept a piece of the wall paper to remind him, on his possible return, of the room as it would be impossible to do so from memory, due to the size of the Escorial. The King fled into exile at peace that one day he, or his descendants would wear the crown again. However, the Napoleonic era was a time of great fashion and the governor of Spain upon occupying in Napoleon’s name, had the entire palace redecorated. Upon Napoleon’s defeat the Spanish King was happy to return home, only to find that the recovery of his amassed jewels had now become impossible. To this day it is still not financially viable to scan the palace for the hidden treasure and some believe it to be but a legend, or lost in a fire that damaged part of the Palace. One day though, we might witness a Spanish King, again crowned with the splendor of the Hapsburg and Bourbon Jewels. The current crown and the other jewels owned by King Juan Carlos I, is kept in trust by the Patrimonio Nacional and seemingly only displayed at official functions.

The "small" Crown of Spain

Sources are vague and information scarce about a second crown held in trust by the Patrimonio Nacional. This photo does exist and seems authentic to a trained jeweller's eye.

Spain/Madrid/Atosha Chapel (Permanent Display 1crown)

Crown/Coronet of Queen Isabella II

Queen Victoria of Great Britain followed the fashion among the royals of her time by having a small coronet made for ease of wear. Her Spanish counterpart had this crown made from diamonds and topazes. Isabella left the crown to the Atosha Chapel after her death where now it is still used to adorn their statue of the Virgin on high feast days. 

Spain/Madrid/National Archeological Museum (Permanent Display of 1votive crown)

Guarazzar Treasure, Votive Crown

The most significant archaeological find dating from pre-medieval times in Spain contained this strange ornament. It is actually a crown from a collection of three crowns in what is now famously known as the Guarazzar Treasure. This particular configuration is known as a votive crown and its use was not in adorning the head but was rather hung above the head when a monarch sat in state upon the throne. It would also be hung over holy altars and crypts.

Spain/Toledo/Toledo Cathedral (Permanent Display 1crown)

Crown of  Castille and Lyon

Spain/Granada/Royal Chapel (Permanent Display 1crown)

Crown of Isabella I

One of many crowns that must have belonged to Queen Isabella I of Spain. It follows the tradition of many other crowns that were donated to Cathedrals, Chapels or Monasteries by Catholic monarch throughout Europe. 

A few crowns are known to exist but have been sold to anonymous buyers and thus the whereabouts are unknown.

 Spain/Location Unconfirmed (Not Displayed)

A Spanish Ducal Coronet in gold, silver and diamonds. Originally made for a Duchess it was sold at auction in recent years.


(All images of the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are copyrighted to the Royal Collection. However the images on this blog are considered defaulted to the public domain due to age and ready sourcing from the internet. If an image on this blog is disputed it will be altered or removed following written protest from an authentic source. please contact me at danielgswan@hotmail.com)